January 19

Wedderburn: Team needed stern half-time talk

first_imgWestern Bureau Omar ‘Rambo’ Wedderburn, coach of St. Elizabeth Technical High (STETHS), revealed yesterday that he gave his team a stern halftime talk before they came back from a goal down to defeat Charlie Smith High 2-1 in their ISSA Champions Cup match at the Montego Bay Sports Complex yesterday. yesterday. Kemoy Bailey gave Charlie Smith the lead in the first minute of the game which they held to the break. However, ten minutes into the second half goalkeeper Devontae Clarke equalised from the penalty spot with his third goal of the season. STETHS continued to apply the pressure which resulted in substitute Adam Griffiths netting the winner in the 65th minute. “I think it is always good to fight from one goal down. The halftime made a difference as the players came out a different team in the second half. It didn’t need any technical or tactical adjustment we just needed heart. We know how to play the ball on a good surface which was lacking in the first half. However, in the second half we came out, and put the ball on the ground,” said Wedderburn. “We had a strong talk in the changing room. Sometimes you have to deal with it like you’re on the street to make them understand,” he added. In their semifinal on Friday STETHS will meet defending Manning Cup Champions Jamaica College who also recorded a come from behind 2-1 win over Holy Trinity. In the other semi-final Cornwall College will face St George’s College.  Yesterday Cornwall defeated Camperdown High 2-0 while St George’s whipped St Andrew Technical 5-0.last_img read more

January 18

Referendums should decide political status

first_imgDear Editor,Reference is made to a letter from Oscar Ramjeet in which he makes mention of an Act by St Vincent Government mandating no longer swearing to the Queen (GT June 3). Mr Ramjeet has been advocating for Caribbean regional governments and dependent territories to make a complete break with England – including removing the Queen as Head of State and the Privy Council as the final court of appeal. It is not clear what gains will be made by such a complete or even a partial break when former colonies are struggling to stay afloat economically and dependencies are begging the Mother countries to remain under their apron. The latter are saying they are better off with the umbilical cord tied to the mother rather than go on their own.Can Mr Ramjeet please tell us what will St Vincent gain by stop making reference to the Queen? By how much will the economy and standard of living grow? How much more freedom will Vincentians have? Would they be allowed to freely criticise Gonsalves and his ruling party without having to worry about political or economic victimisation? Isn’t it better to call the Queen’s name and be a wealthy country (receiving large amounts of aid and visits from British people) than stop calling her name (title) and become a pauper like “Haiti” or Somalia or Mali?Studies have shown that country after country that severed ties with the UK has seen regression rather than progress; standard of living has declined precipitously for most former colonies. Analogously, standard of living in dependent territories has risen and is much higher than independent colonies (countries).How many independent countries in the Region or in Africa or anywhere in the world has a higher standard of living than Bermuda or Anguilla or Turks, all of which still honour “Her Majesty” and make reference to the Queen? With regard to standard of living, just looking at Guyana, Guyana’s standard of living in 1992 was a mere fifth of what it was before the break from England in 1966.During the 1980s, Professor Clive Thomas penned, in a study, that slaves were better off than people in independent Guyana in terms of their quality of life. Guyanese who experienced colonial rule said they were far better off under the “White man” than today or under nationalist rule (independence) or what passes for governance. The standard of living in dependent Anguilla is higher than Guyana.Every country that retains ties (dependency status) with England has been receiving tens of millions of dollars in aid annually from Mother England enjoying a standard of living almost at par with the UK. Same is true of those territories that retain ties with France, America and Holland. Those that still retain the Queen as Head of State also receive substantial aid from Her Majesty’s Government. In addition, English tourists vacation in these former colonies (now independent countries) or current colonies (like St Martin and Aruba), benefiting the economy enormously.If the leaders of these countries want a complete break with the UK or Holland or France or the US, it should be done by a referendum and not by some self-serving corrupt politicians who seek to strengthen their powers at the expense of the people. Ralph Gonsalves is violating the verdict of the population in a referendum he called a few years ago. The voters completely rejected his plan to break with the Queen. Since he now feels so strongly about it (not mentioning the Queen in the Constitution or in governance), why not put it to a vote. If he believes in democracy and people’s empowerment, let the people decide the issue.It is public knowledge that none of the former colonies (now independent countries) have given their population a vote to determine their political status. The dominant elite (of the colonial authority and the political parties and would-be rulers who wanted to replace the privileged British class) arrogated unto themselves to decide what would be best for the population – independence.In places (British territories) where the population was given the vote to decide on their political status, they rejected independence outright. They preferred an associated status with Mother England as is the same with all of the remaining UK dependencies. The same holds true for Dutch and French territories. The people of dependent territories (Turks, Caicos, Anguilla, Virgin Islands, Aruba, Martinique, French Guiana, Saba, Bermuda, Bonaire, Tahiti, Bora Bora, etc) absolutely do not want independence. Voters consistently rejected independence in referendums. Even Puerto Rico, Guam US Virgin islands, etc. do not want to be freed from US rule. One should not forget that Scotland was given the vote to decide on its status (independence) two years ago and they rejected it.As Ramjeet noted, voters in St Vincent and Grenadines rejected a complete break from England via a referendum a few years ago. They have greater faith in the Queen and in the British Privy Council as their final court of arbiter and as their ruler than Ralph Gonsalves. They felt they would get justice from England rather than from their local judges in the Region who are owned by political interests and other corrupt figures. Scholars have noted that Privy Council judgments are independent of political influence; many rulings in the Region were overturned by independent Judges from the Privy Council. Politicians always seek to intervene in court’s judgments in the Caribbean. Burnham did in Guyana. Eric Williams did in Trinidad. Thus, it is better to have an independent judicial institution outside of political influence.It should also be noted that Jamaicans, Bajans, etc, all rejected a complete break from UK. Retaining ties to the UK bring certain benefits and status to colonies and independent countries; enormous aid flow in. the parties in Jamaica repeatedly promised a referendum on ties with England, only to renege on it because popular opinion has consistently been against breaking such ties. The Governments of Belize and Barbados promised a referendum on severing ties with the London Privy Council. They decided against the referendum and simply replaced the Privy Council with the CCJ. The rulers recognised the voters would reject their ill-conceived plan to replace the Privy Council with the CCJ. Mr Ramjeet should call for referendums if the countries want to break completely from England. That is what democracy is about.If politicians feel retaining the Queen as Head of State or the Privy Council are too colonial, let the people decide. Politicians need to stop arrogating unto themselves what they think is best for the people. So far, they have been wrong on almost every decision they made, impoverishing their nations.Yours truly,Vishnu Bisramlast_img read more

January 6

Grauman’s theater is sold

first_imgLANDMARK: The 80 year-old Hollywood icon was bought by CIM but will still show movies. By The Associated Press Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the 80-year-old landmark that attracts droves of tourists every year, has been sold to Hollywood’s largest commercial landlord but will continue to operate as a film house. CIM Group of Los Angeles bought the property Thursday for an undisclosed price from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Center of New York and Barlow Respiratory Hospital of Los Angeles, the firm said in a news release. Mann Theatres has a long-term lease and will continue to operate Grauman’s. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The 1,612-seat theater, built in 1927 by Sid Grauman, has become one of Southern California’s biggest tourist attractions, with its courtyard featuring foot and handprints in concrete from generations of movie stars. The venue hosts dozens of film premieres every year. Its signature pagoda-inspired entrance has two coral-red columns topped by iron masks that hold aloft the bronze roof. Between the columns is a 30-foot dragon carved from stone and guarding the theater entrance are two giant stone Heaven Dogs, original artifacts brought from China by Grauman. CIM was started by Israeli immigrants Kuba and Avi Shemesh with Richard Ressler, and the firm specializes in developing and investing in urban centers. It is largely financed by pools of money raised by institutional investors including the California Public Employees’ Retirement System.last_img read more

December 30

Manuel Pellegrini on Raheem Sterling: ‘I don’t understand why Liverpool boo him’

first_img The Manchester City boss thinks Anfield should welcome back the 21-year-old 1 Manuel Pellegrini claims he does not understand why Liverpool fans would abuse Raheem Sterling.The Manchester City boss thinks Anfield should welcome back the 21-year-old as he makes his first return to his old stomping ground since last summer’s acrimonious £49million switch to the Etihad Stadium on Wednesday.Sterling rejected a new contract offer from Liverpool last year – with his agent controversially claiming he would not re-sign for £900,000 per week – to force through a move to City.Reds fans made clear their disdain for the player during Sunday’s Capital One Cup final at Wembley and the Anfield rematch is unlikely to witness anything different.But Pellegrini said: “I do not understand why the Liverpool fans boo him because I think (James) Milner was very well received here in a similar situation.“It’s not the best but I prefer to have those boos from the other team than from your own fans.“It’s difficult for any player but all of them are prepared to do it without any problem. I don’t see Raheem worrying about that. I don’t have any problems trusting him.“He will maybe receive the same treatment when he arrives at Anfield but I’m absolutely sure he can play without any problem.”Sterling had a poor game when the sides met at Eastlands in November but he performed much better – one poor miss in front of goal aside – at the weekend.Pellegrini has had no thoughts of pulling his player out of the firing line.He said: “I don’t know which will be the starting XI on Wednesday but one player I am sure will start is Raheem Sterling.“It is important for him to play under pressure. I have 100 per cent trust in Raheem.”City prevailed on Sunday after extra time and penalties. Pellegrini expects both sets of players to be tired but hopes the joy of Wembley glory will put an extra spring in his side’s step.The Chilean said: “It was a very long game, but for both teams. I think both teams will arrive with the same hours of resting – but every time you win it is more easy to recover.“I don’t know how they (Liverpool) will react. It’s the revenge, its another comp, they are at home, so we are sure it will be a difficult match to win but we will try to do it from the first minute.”City have breathed fresh life into their season in the past week with an impressive Champions League win at Dynamo Kiev as well as their cup final success.Prior to that they had hit problems with back-to-back defeats to Leicester and Tottenham threatening to derail their title bid before a controversial FA Cup loss at Chelsea.Confidence is now high they can get their league campaign back on track.Pellegrini said: “The complete squad are confident they can win the title, especially as they have the experience.“The first (Premier League) title that this club won – that year, they recovered eight points on Manchester United. With three minutes of the final game to go, United were the champions, but in three minutes football changed.“The whole squad is concentrating on closing that gap. If we can do it sooner, that is better, but while we have chances we’ll continue.”last_img read more

December 29

NEW DUNGLOE CHILDCARE FACILITY OPENS AFTER HEROIC NINE YEAR CAMPAIGN

first_imgThe people of West Donegal are celebrating after the opening of a state-of-the-art preschool and aftercare facility following a capaign which has lasted nine long years.Spraoi le Cheile an exciting purpose built preschool and afterschool facility that has opened its doors to some very excited children in the Dungloe area this week.This new facility follows the work and dedication by a hard working, local, voluntary committee to enhance facilities for the children and parents in Dungloe and the surrounding area. The project which cost €1.1 million and was built by local building contractor Mr. Charlie Doherty of Beleem Construction has received funding and help from Pobail under the National Development Plan, Comhar Naionrai na Gaeltachta Teoranta, Udaras Na Gaeltachta etc.Spraoi Le Cheile offers a baby care facility, a Nionra service where preschool children are taught through the medium of Irish by local native Irish speakers.There is a sensory room for children with learning difficulties and special needs. This room can also be used for those children needing a little time out/chill time if they are feeling a little tired.The afterschool provides a bright and comfortable area for primary students who can come for a period after their school day and complete homework tasks and offers a custom designed computer suite for children to learn their basic computer skills. Spraoi Le Cheile are currently employing 8 people both full and part time. All staff have excellent qualifications, which blend seamlessly together with the latest and most up to date equipment.The opening hours are currently Monday – Friday, 9am – 6pm (but these can be extended to accommodate parents needs).There are full time and sessional places still available. Sproai Le Cheile are a community based group working for the community and are striving to accommodate all children no matter what their needs or specific requirements are.Subvention is also available to parents on low income or income support and this gives parents the opportunity to get back to work or undertake training to enable them to get back into the work force.Spraoi le Cheile is conveniently located off the Carnmore Road in Dungloe (Glenties Road) beside the parochial hall and within walking distance (500 meters) of Dungloe’s Main Street & Supervalu / Aldi/ Lidl Shopping Centres. Contact Details: For more information or to view the facility you can contact Nora/Roseanne on 07495 61686 or Christine on 087 2206225EndsNEW DUNGLOE CHILDCARE FACILITY OPENS AFTER HEROIC NINE YEAR CAMPAIGN was last modified: September 6th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:childcaredungloeSpraoi le Cheilelast_img read more

December 27

Former Wigan boss Paul Jewell quits as Oldham assistant after just one month

first_img Paul Jewell 1 Oldham’s assistant manager Paul Jewell has quit after just over a month in his role with the Sky Bet League One club.Former Wigan and Bradford boss Jewell, 53, was appointed as Latics manager Richie Wellens’ assistant at the end of November.“Oldham Athletic can confirm that Paul Jewell has resigned from his role as assistant manager,” the club announced on their official website.“The club and manager Richie Wellens would like to thank him for his contributions during his time at SportsDirect.com Park.”Jewell, who guided both Wigan and Bradford to promotion to the Premier League, had been out of management since 2012, when he left Ipswich by mutual consent, before taking on the role at Oldham.Wellens was appointed Latics boss in September following the sacking of John Sheridan and initially steered them away from relegation trouble.However, they have slipped back down to 20th in the table after failing to win any of their last five league matches.last_img read more

December 26

Air show to honor pioneer

first_imgCAMARILLO – Aviation pioneer Dick Rutan will be the grand marshal of this weekend’s Camarillo Air Show, which will feature aerobatic performances, airplane rides, music, classic cars and pancake breakfasts. The theme of the 26-year-old show is “Where the Future Encounters the Past” and the event pays tribute to the 30th anniversary of the Camarillo Airport as a general-aviation facility. Rutan made history in December 1986 by flying around the world nonstop and unrefueled in the Voyager aircraft designed by his brother, Burt. The Voyager, which is now in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, was built in Mojave. Dick Rutan made the historic flight with Jeana Yeager, taking off and landing at Edwards Air Force Base. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.The weekend show features military aircraft from the past, including World War II Mitchell B-25 bomber. There will be aerobatic performances in unusual and distinctive planes, including the Czech-built Zlin 50, the Red Bull MiG-17 and the Pitts Biplane. A pancake breakfast will be hosted at 8 a.m. each day by the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of female pilots. The Camarillo Air Show is sponsored by Chapter 723 of the Experimental Aircraft Association, comprised of 250 Ventura County residents.last_img read more

December 22

DD History: HMS Laurentic commemorated as centenary approaches

first_imgCommemorative events will take place in Inishowen and Derry during the week to remember the tragic sinking of the HMS Laurentic.The HMS Laurentic sank off the coast of Fanad Head when it was struck by a mine, leading to the loss of over 350 seamen.In Inishowen a guided coach tour will leave the Shadows Hotel at 10am on the 26th of January. A Wreath Laying ceremony will take place at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Cockhill on the 28th of January at 11am, with other one taking place at St. Mura’s Church of Ireland at 12:30pm in Fahan. Both cemeteries are where some of the crew were laid to rest.These ceremonies will then be followed by a special reception on Saturday at 2pm Fort Dunree.On the 29th of January, a commemorative flotilla will leave Buncrana to the site of the Laurentic wreckage.In Derry, a new Laurentic exhibition will be launched on the 25th, and run for six months. For details on more commemorative events you can visit the Ulster Canada Initiative’s Facebook page.HistoryThe HMS Laurentic was built by Harland and Woolf in Belfast; and was launched just months before the infamous Titanic from the same shipyard.An interesting historical fact is that this boat is responsible for the capture of the notorious Dr. Crippen, a murderer who tried to flee to Canada on the Montrose.When the Captain of the Montrose recognised Crippen and his partner as the wanted fugitives, Scotland Yard Chief Inspector Walter Dew was alerted. Dew picked the HMS Laurentic to sail to Canada faster than the Montrose; despite the Montrose’s departure three days earlier. When the Montrose docked, Dr. Crippen was taken into custody and hanged for his crimes. Dr. Crippen is the first suspect to be captured with the aid of wireless telegraphy.Lough SwillyCarrying 43 tonnes of gold bullion to pay for vital war munitions, on the 23rd of January 1917 the HMS Laurentic began the long voyage from Liverpool to Nova Scotia, with Captain R.A. Norton at the helm.Captain Norton had received an order to discharge five seamen in Buncrana. The crew landed in Buncrana and the men enjoyed a meal at the Lough Swilly Hotel before sailing out towards the North Atlantic Ocean on the 25th of January. Conditions at sea were perilous that night. Snow and hail pummeled the decks, as gale force twelve winds battered the boat and made maneuvering extremely difficult.As they passed Fanad Head, the ship struck a mine. The second mine they struck destroyed the engine room and generators. As the radio relied on electricity, no distress signal could be sent.Men loaded into the lifeboats – no mean feat in complete darkness and gale force winds.Before leaving the ship, Captain Norton checked that no man who survived the blasts were left behind before disembarking.However, despite Captain Norton’s efforts, many of those on the lifeboats did not survive. Many had been fatally wounded already, with most dying from exposure during the night before their rescue the following day.Of the 470 seamen who left Liverpool two days earlier; 350 lost their lives. Corpses washed ashore for many weeks after the sinking.On the 31st of January 1917, 71 bodies were buried on the grounds of St. Mary’s (Church of Ireland).Clergy from different backgrounds came together to honour the deceased, and memorials were erected across Ireland and the UK.DD History: HMS Laurentic commemorated as centenary approaches was last modified: January 22nd, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:commemorationsFanad Headhistoryhms laurenticInishowenLough Swillylast_img read more

December 3

Royal Society Calls for New U.K. Institute on Infectious Diseases

first_imgWith the hope of centralizing research on human and animal diseases in the United Kingdom, the Royal Society today published a policy statement calling for the creation of a National Institute of Infectious Diseases.The society’s report says that an “integrated approach to infectious diseases would lead to overall improvements in public health and decrease response times to major outbreaks.” This is important when dealing with diseases that can jump the species barrier in a sustained way, says virologist John McCauley of the National Institute for Medical Research, who contributed to the society’s report. He cites, for example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad-cow disease, and different strains of avian influenza as human health concerns that are linked to animal diseases.The new NIID would be an umbrella organization to bring together technical know-how, research expertise, and funding on infectious diseases. Currently, animal disease research is funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whereas human disease is funded by the Medical Research Council and the Department of Health. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The Royal Society’s statement highlights the key role for infectious disease research of the U.K.’s Institute for Animal Health at Pirbright, a research facility built more than 50 years ago that is now showing its age. “The redevelopment of the IAH facility at Pirbright should be a priority,” it concludes. The report echoes the recommendations of a 2007 review undertaken after a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak was traced to a release of the virus from the Pirbright site. The so-called Anderson report warned at the time that IAH’s “governance and funding arrangements are muddled and ineffective” and highlighted the importance of the Pirbright Site Redevelopment Programme, proposed in 2003. At the time, the estimated £120 million cost for that project was to be divided among BBSRC, Defra, and what is now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. BBSRC and DIUS are still keen on the Pirbright redevelopment plan, but Defra’s commitment to deliver its £67 million share has been questioned. The U.K.’s ability to respond to future epidemics needs an integrated approach, with a common pool of knowledge and a critical mass of scientists with different expertise, says microbiologist Keith Gull of the University of Oxford, who chaired the Royal Society committee whose work led to the new policy statement. A strong animal research institute at Pirbright is fundamental to that goal, he adds.last_img read more

December 1

European researchers spin off sister marches for science in at least eight countries

first_imgAMSTERDAM—U.S. cities won’t be the only places where lab coats and science-inspired signs will fill the streets on 22 April. Groups in eight European countries have announced “solidarity marches” in support of the U.S. March for Science, to be held on Earth Day. Some of the rallies will take place on the same day, whereas others don’t yet have a firm date.Marches are in the planning stages in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Switzerland, Ireland, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Bigger countries may see several; in the United Kingdom, for instance, there are already plans to march in London, Edinburgh, and Manchester. In Norway, researchers plan to take to the streets in Oslo and Trondheim. (There will be marches in New Zealand and Australia as well.)”We are thrilled,” a spokesperson for the U.S. March for Science says in an email to ScienceInsider. “The Women’s March really changed the game here.  The second this march was announced we began getting emails from cities all over the world with people planning on satellite marches. At this point, the Washington march and rally is a small part of a larger movement, which is exactly as it should be.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In France, 22 April is hardly ideal, because it’s the eve of the first round of voting for the French presidential election. “But we plan to do it that day anyway,” says astrophysicist Olivier Berné of the Research Institute in Astrophysics and Planetology in Toulouse, a member of the organizing group. The idea for a march coalesced on Twitter, just as it did in the United States, Berné says. French scientists routinely demonstrate against declining budgets and a lack of job opportunities, and some of the organizers of the April protest are experienced, Berné says. Frances’s main march will be in Paris, but there are also plans for marches in Lyon, Toulouse, and Montpellier; Berné says the group is seeking support from scientific organizations and societies. The proliferation of marches is happening as non-U.S. scientists are increasingly debating how to respond to the Trump administration—and, in some cases, taking action. More than 5000 people have already signed a pledge to boycott academic conferences in the United States in response to Trump’s executive order halting the flow of refugees and suspending immigration from seven majority-Muslim countries. An Australian anesthesiologist announced on Twitter that he would stop reviewing papers for U.S. journals. Many others, however, think boycotts would harm U.S. science and would be counterproductive.Meanwhile, the European Molecular Biology Organization in Heidelberg, Germany, has set up the Science Solidarity List, where scientists can offer bench or desk space to colleagues stranded as a result of the measures. More than 480 researchers in dozens of countries have made offers; it’s not clear whether there have been any takers. *Update, 3 February, 5:30 a.m.: The list of countries has been updated to include New Zealand and Australia.last_img read more