April 21

Judges rule in favour of bus industry

first_imgIn a test case that affects all UK bus operators, the Court of Appeal has overturned a ruling by Leeds Crown Court, about the rights of wheelchair users on buses.It means that the current interpretation of the law – that other passengers, such as those with buggies can only be asked to vacate the wheelchair space not be forced to leave it – is upheld.Doug Paulley, 36, was denied access to a First bus to Leeds when a woman with a pushchair refused to move because her baby was asleep. He took First to court and won at Leeds County Court, which ordered First to pay 5,500 in damages. However, First appealed the judgement.Both First and Mr Paulley have made it clear that the issue was not about how the particular incident was handled, about which there are no complaints, but the general principle about access to the wheelchair space if it is occupied by a non-wheelchair user.First’s policy is one of “requesting” non-disabled travellers, including those with babies and pushchairs, to vacate space needed by a wheelchair user.In September, a county court judge said the firm’s policy “first come, first served” was unlawful discrimination in breach of the Equality Act 2010.However, three judges at the Court of Appeal ruled the “proper remedy” for wheelchair users to get improvements in such cases, is to ask Parliament to change the law.Commenting on the decision, First UK Bus MD Giles Fearnley said: “The verdict has given our passengers, drivers and the wider transport industry much needed clarification about the priority use of the wheelchair space on board buses, following two previous conflicting rulings.“Our current policy, which is to ask other passengers in the strongest polite terms to make way for those who need the space, will remain in place.“We recognise how important it is that bus services are accessible for all customers – indeed we are leading the industry in improving bus travel for disabled customers. That good work will continue.”last_img read more

April 21

Roberts’ eight start work

first_imgRoberts Travel Group has put eight new Volvo B8RLEs, with MCV bodies, to work on Leicester’s park-and-ride routes, operated under contract for Leicestershire County Council.Eight new Volvo/MCV B8RLEs for Roberts Travel’s Leicester park-and-ride contractWith 75 vehicles, a quarter of Roberts’ fleet is Volvo, which led to the order for more. Says MD Jonathan Hunt: “The fuel consumption, reliability and size of this particular vehicle, with capacity for 91 passengers, perfectly meet our needs for this contract.”Founded in 1995 and based in Hugglescote, Roberts also runs a school service and a tendered service route. Its holidays division was created in 2005 providing coach holidays in the UK and Europe.last_img

April 21

Tina Turner musical confirmed for West End

first_imgA brand new musical based on the life and hits of iconic artist Tina Turner will have its world premiere at the West End’s Aldwych Theatre in March 2018.World premier of Tina Turner musical confirmed for London’s West End in March Previews of the new production called Tina will begin on 21 March with a press night on 17 April. The musical is initially booking to 16 June 2018.Tina follows the journey of Tina Turner from her humble beginnings in Tennessee to conquering the globe as the ‘Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll’.Charting an acclaimed career, which spanned more than fifty years, Tina Turner is one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time, initially rising to fame in the 1960s alongside then-husband Ike Turner.Her subsequent international solo career earned her widespread recognition and numerous awards, including three Grammys. She went on to deliver more chart-topping albums and hits, receiving a further eight Grammy Awards and reportedly selling more concert tickets than any other solo performer in history.The revered singer was introduced into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991 and has often been voted as one of the most successful female rock ‘n’ roll artists of all time.Casting for Tina will be announced in due course.Book tickets at tinathemusical.comlast_img read more

April 21

Go-Ahead buys Oxford’s City Sightseeing Oxford operator

first_imgGo-Ahead owned Oxford Bus Company (OBC) has bought Tom Tappin Ltd, which operates the Guide Friday and City Sightseeing Oxford city bus tours.Tom Tappin Ltd will join the OBC family of companies, that also includes Thames Travel and Carousel Buses.The City Sightseeing Oxford operation will continue to be run as a standalone business, under the management of General Manager Jane Marshall and Operations Manager John Corti.Go-Ahead says: “Over time, it is anticipated that OBC will bring fresh investment to the City Sightseeing business and that the acquisition will lead to improved opportunities for cross-selling between the City Tour and other Oxford Bus Company brands such as Park & Ride, the airline and X90 coach services, and the new tourist-focused River Rapids routes.”OBC MD Phil Southall says: “It’s really exciting to be taking ownership of such a successful and professionally-managed business, which has a long and proud history in Oxford.“We’re looking forward to working closely with the team at City Sightseeing to learn more about the company and to develop plans to ensure we collectively give the best possible welcome to visitors to our city.”last_img read more

April 21

DTC refuses licence as it would be operated by partnership

first_imgA Wakefield taxi operator who refused an offer of a one-vehicle restricted licence because he wanted to continue with his application for a two-vehicle licence, has had it refused after it was revealed he would be operating in partnership with his cousin.Shakil Hussain Jumma, trading as Access Transport, was seeking a two-vehicle restricted licence before Deputy Traffic Commissioner (DTC) Gillian Ekins after requesting a Public Inquiry.The DTC said that Mr Jumma had submitted his application in June and things had reached a bit of an impasse. It was indicated that the two-vehicle licence would be refused.Mr Jumma was offered the grant of a one-vehicle licence with an undertaking that he does not drive the vehicle.In reply to the DTC, Mr Jumma admitted he had not taken any legal advice. He said that he rented out 10 taxis trading as Access Cars. He had not applied for a national licence though it was something he eventually wished to go into. To start with the PSV operation would be an add-on to his current main business as he did not think it would generate sufficient income for a year or two.Mr Jumma’s cousin Mr Hussain said that before applying for a licence they had visited the Traffic Area Office and taken advice. He would be in some sort of partnership with his cousin. If the business grew sufficiently he would sit the CPC examination. It was a case of getting a niche market to suit them. They needed to get used to the rules and regulations for operating PSVs before moving on to a national licence. They were currently both sole traders and they would have to perhaps set up a partnership or a limited company, but they felt it was better if it was a partnership. He agreed with the DTC that they were in it 50/50.After the DTC had pointed out that the financial evidence initially submitted was a bank account in the name of Advanced Taxis, a business Mr Jumma had told her he had sold 10 years previously, Mr Jumma said he hadn’t realised he needed to shut it. They had made a lot of mistakes. There had been no intention to mislead anyone.Refusing the application, the DTC said that the application had been made as a sole trader yet the licence would have been operated by a partnership.Both men had been open and honest, and they had come over as professional people, but they needed to find a way to meet the regulations.They could either amalgamate their sole trader businesses so that the partnership had a main occupation or, preferably, apply for a national licence with an external transport manager until one of the partners obtained a CPC.last_img read more

April 21

TC calls for greater awareness of mental health

first_img‘It is a major concern’ says regulator as he reminds Transport Managers of need to exercise controlTraffic Commissioner Tim Blackmore has called on operators to pay close attention to their drivers’ mental health after revealing that one individual called to a driver conduct hearing was suicidal.“Mental health is a major concern for me at driver conduct hearings,” says Mr Blackmore. He was speaking last week at the Confederation of Passenger Transport Northern Region AGM, held in Jesmond.“It has become a real issue. As a sector we have not yet quite grasped that yet.” He adds that Transport Managers (TMs) bear a responsibility to monitor drivers’ mental health as part of their duty to exercise continuous and effective control over an operation.“I cannot suspend a driving licence on the grounds of mental health, but I can flag my concerns to DVSA. If a TC does that, DVSA is likely to follow it up.”Mr Blackmore advises that operators should have a risk management policy in place that prevents employees from driving should they be judged incapable of doing their job safely.last_img read more

April 20

Man Pulls AK47 at McDonalds Drive-Thru

first_img WhatsApp Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook By Carl Stutsman – October 22, 2019 2 758 Twitter IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Pinterest ABC 57 News/ Justin Stewart We’ve all been frustrated at the Drive-thru, but now a local man is behind bars for taking it a couple of steps too far.Justin Stewart is facing two charges of intimidation after police say he pulled an AK47 on another driver that he claimed cut the line in front of him at a McDonalds. The incident happened at the McDonald’s on Lincolnway East just before midnight on Friday. The victims say that Stewart first confronted them without the firearm, but went to retrieve it when they told him to go away.When police tracked him down the rifle was found on the passenger seat.You can read more here with our reporting partners at ABC 57 News Man Pulls AK47 at McDonalds Drive-Thru Previous articleSheriff: Michigan crop heists are a ‘major league operation’Next article6 safety tips on avoiding collisions with deer this season Carl Stutsmanlast_img read more

April 20

Climate tax on imports to split commissioners

first_imgTrade Commissioner Peter Mandelson this week warned that a French-style carbon tax would undermine international climate change co-operation and run into WTO problems. His spokesman said the trade chief was also likely to oppose a sector-specific border levy of the sort suggested in the communication. “Legally we have to watch out for any discriminatory border taxation…and Mr Mandelson’s essential message is that the politics of punitive measures gets the climate change message wrong. It will not encourage the necessary co-operation from our trade partners.”Enterprise Commissioner Günter Verheugen in a November letter to his peers said he would support a CO2 import tax. A spokesman for Energy Commissioner Andris Piebalgs refused to comment.The paper will suggest making the fight against climate change Europe’s top international priority. It says that international climate change discussions “must move beyond rhetoric towards negotiations on concrete commitments”. It says that even poor countries should face emission-reduction measures by 2020. Developed countries should commit themselves to a 30% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2020, the paper says.A separate paper reviewing overall energy strategy, also for publication on 10 January, will suggest asking the EU to reduce its CO2 emissions from energy use by 20% by 2020, 35% by 2030 and 50% by 2050.Nuclear power and clean coal, using carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, will also get support. Improved CCS technologies are needed because “it is not in Europe’s security of supply or economic interest for coal-fired generation to die out”, according to the paper. The strategy paper warns that reducing nuclear power in the EU will make it hard to meet CO2 emission reduction targets. It recommends that Europe should “further develop the most advanced framework for nuclear energy in those member states that chose nuclear power”. The draft warns that any levy adopted would have to be compatible with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules and should not restrict international trade.The idea of a levy was floated in a discussion paper prepared by the Commission’s enterprise department in the early autumn and has now been picked up and promoted in the climate change paper.The “most likely” solution, it suggests, would be to impose a border levy system on “the industrial sectors which are both heavy emitters and subject to international competition (eg, aluminium, iron and steel, cement, refineries, pulp and paper)”.A Commission official said the levy idea was only a suggestion and the Commission intended to look at the pros and cons before publishing any concrete recommendations to follow the communication. The Commission is now studying the compatibility of a border carbon levy with WTO rules. Environment Commissioner Stavros Dimas called for a decision “without delay”.The Commission’s plan falls short of a French call to tax all imports from countries which do not face CO2 reduction targets under the Kyoto Protocol.center_img A Commission paper on climate change, prepared by the transport and energy department, advocates a “border carbon levy that would put imported products on a competitive footing identical to that of domestically produced goods”. This could affect large exporting countries such as China and the US, which are not subject to the same carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction targets as the EU.The paper will be discussed by the College of commissioners on 10 January as part of the Commission’s energy review.The communication on long-term climate change policy options calls on the EU to look at “all possible ways of reducing greenhouse gas emissions”.last_img read more

April 20

Olympian Hoops 11 August

first_imgThe Italian Foreign and former European commissioner Minister Franco Frattini visited the Italian Olympic delegation and expects excellent performances from his compatriots. “I will be watching it all on TV because I’m sure there would be perfect performances. I like diving. We Italians have very good traditions of diving and we aim for medals.” Mr.Frattini will be happy to know that the Italian Olympic football team managed to beat Honduras in their opening game of the tournament.Athletes who get their hand on Olympic medals will get rewards, often financial ones, when they come back to their respective home countries. The Belarusian athletes who return back from Beijing with a gold medal around their necks can also expect a life-time supply of sausages, according to a Belarusian meat company. “We haven’t really figured out how we will solve it practically but I suppose that we have to send them a package of sausages once or twice a month, said the CEO of the company. He also added that they will listen to the gold medallists’ specific demands on sausage flavours. Belarus claimed two Olympic gold medals in the 2004 Olympics.They opened up the games 8 minutes past 8 on the 8th of August so we sort of understand which number is the luckiest of them all to the Chinese. So it comes as no surprise that 16,400 couples decided to get married in Beijing on Friday. More than 100.000 couples did the same across the country. A safe bet is that most of them tied the knot around 8 o’clock…It is estimated that 3 billion viewers watched the Opening ceremony of the Olympics and another 91,000 will follow it directly in the futuristic Olympic Stadium in Beijing, called the Bird nest. It remain dubious whether so many people will tuned into  the American actress/activist Mia Farrow’s “alternative” Olympic opening ceremony on a web cast the same day. The web cast, called “The Dafur Olympics” showed refugees from the Sudanese region in the barren deserts of eastern Chad playing sports on sandy fields. Several human rights group, including Ms. Farrow’s  “Dream for Darfur” claims that the Olympic host China buys nearly two-thirds of Sudan’s oil and is believed to provide Sudan with most of its small arms, many of which might end up being used in Darfur. Six artists, including REM have donated about 20 minutes of recorded concerts posted on Farrow’s Web site as part of the alternative ceremony. Lastly we spare a thought to the tiny little Asian country Brunei, which was barred from attending the opening ceremony after the country’s Olympic committee forgot to register their two participants. The 15-year old swimmer Maria Grace Koh and the short putter Mohammed Yazid Yatimi Yusof had to watch the spectacles from the sidelines.last_img read more

April 20

Will he stay or will he go?

first_imgHow long will it be before Philip Lowe, the European Commission’s director-general for energy, leaves town? Lowe, who joined the Commission in 1973, has already prolonged his career beyond the standard retirement age, but is scheduled to leave at the end of the year, at the age of 66. However, some confusion has been created by an announcement in the summer that Lowe, whose previous job in the Commission was director-general for competition, is to be a non-executive director of the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority, a regulatory body that is being launched in October. A Commission spokesman said that Lowe had permission to attend a few preliminary meetings before his December departure.last_img